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The sexual human

Written: by Isira | Published: September 4, 2017

Those of you who pay any attention to the media tabloids would be well aware of the vast array of articles on the topic of sexual offences.

Although it is constant and common to hear of these issues in our society it is very rare for us to take a closer or deeper look at why we see so many issues of perversion, violation and obsession.

Fundamental to all human issues is the inherent lack of understanding of our true self. In this undeveloped and ignorant state we are sorely lacking in social education that helps us grow from youth to adulthood with a deep sense of awareness, integrity and wholeness.

Our Indigenous cultures called this rites of passage. It helped every child become acquainted with themselves and with life – exploring all of the wonders, powers and limitations of what it means to be human in every way – and most significantly, in a sacred way. These passages involved a process of cultivating profound respect for our self, each other and life. It allowed each child to embrace themselves first as a child of creation, then as an integral part of a working whole – within family and nature, then as a being of beauty, then as a responsible and valued person, then as a sexual being, then as a creative being, then as a nurturing adult, then as a keeper of wisdom with the responsibility to pass on these sacred ethics. And more specific to sexual development, it was honoured and regarded as something sacred, natural, powerful and beautiful. It was embraced within the holistic framework of what it means to be human. Each person had a deep and fundamental understanding that simply, as a human being they are worthy, beautiful, valuable and powerful.

Our modern society teaches us from the very early stages of development that sex is our most powerful and important quality. If you are sexy you are happy. If you are sexy you get what you want. If you are sexy you will succeed. If you are sexy you are valuable. It’s in our advertising every where, every day. It’s in our music. It’s in our fashion. It’s in our art, our sport and entertainment. It’s everywhere we turn. We have sexualized our humanness. And even more sadly, if you look at our children’s clothing, advertising, music and toys – you see it there too. At a sub-conscious level it drives our most powerful emotions and needs. Yet we are also taught overtly and subtly – that sex is bad, a taboo, something to be ashamed of. These two opposing messages are continuously vying for a position and in the middle is the unaware child, a fragile being absorbing the profound struggle of this contradiction. So is it any wonder as adults our society is sexually disturbed?

I am not suggesting that we can go back to Indigenous living. I am suggesting that we need to find a way to renew our developmental experience. And for that we can draw upon the wisdom of our natural cultures. We need to cultivate a way for our children and society to re-unite with the sacredness of being human. Our children and people of the earth need to once again feel and know their true nature. We need to share in the power, the purpose and value of what it means to simply be human. We need to cultivate a life of sacred awareness. And we need to give it to our children NOW.

Copyright © 2017 Isira Sananda